Natural labyrinth in Glendurgan Garden

Natural labyrinth in Glendurgan Garden

The labyrinths have been known since ancient times. They were used in ancient Egypt or Mesopotamia. Greek mythology is known for its Cretan labyrinth. Today, they are found in parks, gardens, or fields as a tourist attraction. One of them is the maze in Glendurgan Garden, which is over 170 years old….
The labyrinth is part of the Glendurgan garden located in Cornwall (England). Its design and execution was taken care of by Alfred Fox in the early 20s and 30s of the nineteenth century. It is located in a wooded valley, where many large trees and shrubs grow, but a number of rare and exotic plants from all over the world deserve special attention. They were collected by Fox while he was traveling with a shipping company. After his death, the family continued to take care of the garden until 1962, when they handed it over to the National Trust.
The pearl of this place, however, is not an exotic plant but a labyrinth. It started to be created in 1833 using cherry laurel tree. Its shape resembles a snake rolled up in the grass, and it can be very difficult to overcome it. However, all the effort is compensated for by the fact that you have reached a roofed viewing point with a view of the garden.

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