Multiport VoIP gateways

Multiport VoIP gateways

Thanks to multi-port VoIP gateways, we have at our disposal in one device at once four, eight or more FXS ports, so that with a greater demand for simultaneous telephone calls, both outgoing and incoming, we can satisfy such a need with one device.
As in the case of gates with fewer telephone ports, and in the case of VoIP gates of this type, we can connect telephone sets or telephone exchanges to them, through the ports of city lines of these exchanges.
Figure: Connecting phones to a multi-port VoIP gateway with FXS ports
Legend: WAN socket (type RJ-45) – connection from the Internet LAN socket (type RJ-45) – connection of: computer, local IP network, network devices FXS socket (type RJ-11) – connection of telephones FXO socket (type RJ-11) – connection of analog telephone line Twisted-pair computer cable (Ethernet) terminated with RJ-45 connectors Flat-pair telephone cable, two or four-wire telephone cable terminated with RJ-11 connectors
Figure: Connecting a multi-port VoIP gateway with FXS ports to a PABX
Legend: WAN socket (type RJ-45) – connection from the Internet LAN socket (type RJ-45) – connection of: computer, local IP network, network devices FXS socket (type RJ-11) – connection of telephones FXO socket (type RJ-11) – connection of analog telephone line Twisted-pair computer cable (Ethernet) terminated with RJ-45 connectors Flat-pair telephone cable, two or four-wire telephone cable terminated with RJ-11 connectors
Gateways with more phone ports than described in this section have an additional FXO port, which in this case is usually treated as a backup phone line connection. Most often this port is galvanically connected with the first FXS port in the VoIP gateway, which in case of problems with the Internet, VoIP service provider, power supply or the gateway itself, the user connected to the first telephone port has ensured communication with the outside world – it is also possible to reach it through this backup telephone line.
In the case of multi-port VoIP gateways, we can often meet with their division into three groups, due to the types of telephone ports available in them:
VoIP gateways with FXS-type ports (they may have an additional FXO-type port as a backup for calls) from which we “retrieve” the telephone signal to the terminal devices from the network of Internet telephony service providers (the first two drawings on this page),
VoIP gateways with ports of the FXO type to which we deliver the telephone signal in order to create new possibilities with the use of VoIP telephony (application example: both drawings below),
VoIP gateways with mixed ports, e.g. several FXS ports and several FXO ports.
While the first group of gates is a group whose application can be easily imagined (the telephone signal from the gateway is delivered either to the phones or to the telephone exchange), the gateway from the second group is harder to imagine. The question arises: why do someone need FXO ports in large numbers to which a telephone signal needs to be brought? The answer is quite simple.
Imagine that you have a PBX and would like to use VoIP connections, but it so happens that you cannot connect the gateways with FXS ports to the PBX, because you cannot connect new telephone lines to the PBX from which you would receive the telephone signal (e.g. there are no analog ports for city lines, because all of them are occupied by landlines). Or another situation: you have a PBX that only has digital (not analogue) city ports, which are needed to connect most types of VoIP gateways. What should I do then? Connect a VoIP gateway with FXO ports to the analog internal lines of the control panel. Why? In order to be able to call outside the organization via internal lines and the connected VoIP gateways with FXO ports (see figure below).
Figure: Connecting a VoIP gateway with FXO ports to the internal lines of a PABX control panel
Legend: WAN socket (type RJ-45) – connection from the Internet LAN socket (type RJ-45) – connection of: computer, local IP network, network devices FXO socket (type RJ-11) – connection of analog telephone line Direction of making outgoing calls Computer cable of twisted pair type (Ethernet) terminated with RJ-45 connectors Flat telephone cable, two or four wires terminated with RJ-11 connectors
These gateways can be programmed to assign user accounts of the selected VoIP provider to their FXO ports and to be able to call the telephone lines connected to these gateways and make further calls. In other words, I call the selected extension number of the PBX, I am connected not to the phone that should be connected there, but to the VoIP gateway connected there, in my handset zam

  • Prev Post
  • Next Post